WORKSHOP: Practice Writing Without Fear With Nina Rota and Ellen Krout-Hasegawa

Practice Writing Without Fear With Nina Rota and Ellen Krout-Hasegawa

We use short meditations, free writing, and word exercises to help creative people develop ways of diving into the stream of consciousness without sinking. We will focus on exercises to get our mind and body working together in a smooth flow without being interrupted by our negative inner voices and the negative voices which surround us. This workshop is for writers and anyone else who is creative—visual artists, video bloggers, designers—anyone using the creative process.

Date And Time: Sat, April 6, 2019, 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM
Location: 1888 Center, 115 North Orange Street, Orange, California 92866

The cost of the workshop is $20. Please purchase tickets here.

Nina Rota is a writer and filmmaker. Her writing can be found in Witness Magazine, Entropy, and Red Fez among others. Her short films have appeared in Getty Museum’s Pacific Standard Time project and Anthology Film Archives. She is currently working on a book of essays titled Walls Crumble Before Me…

Ellen Krout-Hasegawa is a gender-queer artist, writer and native Angeleno. For more than a dozen years at the LA Weekly she wrote a plethora on books, theater, music and good times. Her writing has appeared in the LA Times, X-Tra Contemporary Art Quarterly, and Hers 2: Brilliant New Fiction by Lesbians. Currently, she can be found with some frequency at the Tom of Finland Foundation, known only as “Owen.”

Nina Rota Interview in the Los Feliz Ledger

[BOOK CLUB] Finding Comfort in Chaos with Nina Rota

Julia Ingalls was kind enough to interview me in the Los Feliz Ledger on July 31, 2019. We talked about the the quarterly reading series Sara Finnerty Turgeon and I organize at the Women’s Center for Creative Work, and my book of linked essays in progress titled Walls Crumble Before Me…

And yes, we also talked about finding some comfort in the chaos that is know as identity.

Roar Shack presents “You in the Sky”

roar shack you in the sky

I won the Live Write contest at Roar Shack last month so I get to read at this month’s event on October 14, 4-6pm, at 826LA in Echo Park (next to Stories bookstore). Actually, I didn’t win, I tied, but not bad for having to write a six-minute story on a prompt chosen by someone else that you then have to read in front of a large group of people. I was terrified!

A bunch of talented writers, all women—appropriately, will be reading with me: Angela Stubbs, Kristin Casey, Sandy Yang, Tamala Whittley, and Tara Taylor Donlan.

Wine and cookies await you.

 

What makes you QUEER? at Glendale Gay Pride

One paragraph and/or one piece answering the question: What makes you QUEER? Join 40 writers and artists (including me) at ACE/121 Gallery for the first ever Gay Pride event in Glendale.

Opening night is this Friday, 6-9pm. There’ll be a DTGlendale Artwalk between Abril Books/Roslin Art Gallery and ACE/121 Gallery with the afterparty at Gauchos Village.

This event is hosted by  ACE/121 GalleryAbril BooksRoslin Art Gallery, and Gay And Lesbian Armenian Society

WCCW Reading Series: RETHINKING

Mark your calendars! Please join us for a chain of Los Angeles literary luminaries: Dana JohnsonDésirée Zamorano, Bonnie S. Kaplan, and Ryka Aoki, at the Women’s Center for Creative Work on Thursday, December 7@7:30pm, 2017. Each of our writers has chosen a reader who, in turn, has chosen the next reader.

More information.

this imaginal is a child playing

I use channeling to help my writing. to write. i ask questions to get deeper into subjects. instead, let me enter the imaginal space. a child playing. does a child ask questions to go deeper into a subject. yes, maybe, at least some of the time. but not by design, by play. a star is a magical being in the sky, not an ancient object which has been interpreted as the same shape by countless cultures throughout history. a child in play would not care about that. a talking alligator walking out of a swamp for instance, or a dancing cat. much more of fascination. and these are not parlor tricks. what does it mean to travel a light year? would i need shoes since gravity is optional. the alligator is wearing hobnail boots so i was wondering. the dancing cat, what would that look like now? do children ask these kinds of questions or do they watch the show unfold.